Community. Friendship. Music. Dance.
Community. Friendship. Music. Dance.

Code of Conduct/Safe Spaces Policy.

A serious note about our Code of Conduct:

 

By attending Tuesday Night Blues or any of Colorado Blues Dance events you are agreeing to the terms and conditions of this Code of Conduct. If you transgress these terms, you will be required to adjust your choices and behavior or will be indefinitely or permanently banned from our dance and other social events. 

 

Some encouraging words for beginner dancers and new members.

 

We have a lot of people who attend our events with a wide variety of backgrounds and skillsets. However, every single person started out as a “Newbie.” If you are new to dancing it’s important to know that the higher level dancers have been working at it for a long time. The only difference between you and them is about 5,000 hours of practice. It may take a few months to feel comfortable dancing! Hang in there. Attend classes and workshops. If you can’t afford lessons, you can often work out trade agreements with organizers and instructors for lessons. Don’t ask instructors to show you tips and tricks while you’re on the social floor. Kick in the $5 for the beginner class. You deserve it! Remember that even instructors are still expected to train and practice! 

 

Short Hand:
BE RADICALLY GENTLE WITH YOURSELF WHILE LEARNING.
DON’T ASK INSTRUCTORS TO TEACH YOU ON THE DANCE FLOOR.
THE ONLY DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A BEGINNER AND AN ADVANCED DANCER IS 5,000 HOURS OF PRACTICE. 

 

Consequences if a dancer compromises this section of the Code of Conduct:

You might remove yourself from something you really enjoy before you learn how to enjoy it fully.
You might annoy other dancers if you don’t attend classes and expect them to dance with you. 
An organizer may ask you to attend a class, workshop or a series before you attend another dance.

 

Interacting with new dancers:

If you are a more practiced dancer remember you were once a nervous novice dancer. Please consider that it can be intimidating for new people to attend a social dance. It’s important to look around and realize that every community thrives because of its brand new people. Treat all new dancers with respect and approach their process with curiosity. Support their studies by encouraging them to dance and telling them when classes and workshops are available. It is appropriate to tell someone when they’ve crossed a personal boundary. Please prioritize your safety and comfort. It is not appropriate to teach someone on the social dance floor. It is exceedingly disrespectful to give feedback on someone’s dancing outside of the context of a practica. There is no exception to this.

 

Short Hand: 
BE KIND TO NEW DANCERS AND MEMBERS.
LEAVE INSTRUCTION FOR THE INSTRUCTORS DURING CLASS TIME. 
NO TEACHING ON THE SOCIAL DANCE FLOOR.
ADVOCATE FOR YOUR OWN COMFORT AND SAFETY.
DO NOT GIVE UNSOLICITED ‘ADVICE’ OR ‘FEEDBACK.
 
Consequences if a dancer compromises this section of the Code of Conduct:

You can expect that other dancers will become annoyed and may not dance with you.
The organizer or host for the evening will directly request for you to adjust your behavior. 
If you refuse to comply or become indignant you will be asked to leave. 
If this is a repeat offense you may be suspended for an appropriate amount of time from attending the dance or other social events hosted by Tuesday Night Blues organizers.

 

 

Asking people to dance. 

 

Use your words! It’s pretty simple, maybe not always easy, but this is how it’s done around here. Ask anyone you want to dance by making eye contact and then saying, “Would you like to dance?” with your words. Avoid tapping people on the shoulder or interrupting conversations. It’s most exciting when someone enthusiastically says “YES!” Sometimes people say “NO.” Keep in mind that’s also exciting because they’ve given you a great opportunity to find someone else who says “YES” or to solo dance! Some of our dancers are Leads and some are Follows and some prefer to Switch. It does not have anything to do with gender. Be prepared to be asked about your preference and it’s always a good idea to ask what their preference is. It can be helpful to ask someone what role they prefer before you ask them to dance so that way you can both find someone that will allow you to dance the role you wish to!  
 If you become concerned that you’re getting too many NO’s, it’s a good time to approach an instructor on how best to improve your dancing and etiquette to get more enthusiastic Yesses! Don’t pester the people who are attending the dance. It is appropriate to request direct feedback from other dancers away from the floor, but be prepared to listen to their direct and thoughtful response. Continually asking somebody to dance who consistently says NO is disrespectful to their  non-verbal boundaries. Work on your dance by attending class, not by making feel bad for saying No. 

 

Short Hand

USE YOUR WORDS “WOULD YOU LIKE TO DANCE?” 
DO NOT SETTLE FOR LESS THAN ENTHUSIASTIC CONSENT.
EVERY PERSON HAS 100% AUTHORITY OVER WHO GETS TO TOUCH THEM.
NO ONE “OWES” YOU A DANCE.
MAKE IT OKAY FOR PEOPLE TO SAY NO TO YOU.
IF SOMEONE SAYS NO TO YOU THREE TIMES, LEAVE THEM ALONE UNTIL THEY APPROACH YOU.
ASK IF YOUR PARTNER LIKES TO LEAD, FOLLOW OR SWITCH OR AT LEAST BE PREPARED FOR THE QUESTION YOURSELF. 
ADVOCATE FOR YOUR NEEDS AND COMFORT.
IF YOU WANT MORE “YESSES” OR DANCE REQUESTS, GO TO MORE CLASSES, DON’T PESTER PEOPLE.
ASK FOR FEEDBACK PRIVATELY, OFF THE DANCE FLOOR.
TAKE CLASSES OR JOIN A TROUPE.

 

Consequences if a dancer compromises this section of the Code of Conduct:

If you annoy enough people, it will become very difficult to feel connected and to get the dances you really want.
An organizer or host for the evening will directly request for you to adjust your behavior. 
An organizer may ask you to attend a class, workshop or series before attending another social dance.
If you refuse to comply or become indignant you will be asked to leave. 
If this is a repeat offense you may be suspended for an appropriate amount of time from attending the dance or other social events hosted by Tuesday Night Blues organizers.

 

Dating in our Dance Scene.

 

Occasionally people meet and have a mutual romantic interest in each other at our events. It’s pretty special when this happens and we love supporting healthy, consensual romantic dynamics. It can be confusing to date at all, much less in our tight-knit niche community so we have written a code here to help guide you.

In our small community word travels fast and furious so we recommend taking your time when you are getting to know someone. This is a safe place for a wide variety of people to dance with and learn from each other. Please do not use our community as your primary access to casual sex. There are apps for that.
Use direct, verbal communication to express your interest. Chemistry is a powerful thing and it may or may not be fully reciprocated. Make sure you know where you stand with someone by having a conversation with them. This is a requirement without exception. Be sure to get an enthusiastic response to your inquiry before moving forward. Nobody wants to date somebody who’s not interested in them. If you think otherwise, then we recommend doing some self-reflecting and reading on “coercion” before attending another social dance event. 
Consider what your needs are before engaging with someone romantically or sexually. Have a conversation with your interest that involves what you’re really wanting out of a romantic or sexual interaction BEFORE you engage. For example: “I am wanting a serious partner to build a family with” or “I really want to explore sexuality with a few different friends.” Any preference is fine, but please specify what you want to create from the experience before you engage with another human being. 
  Anything that happens before this conversation could end up being very confusing for the parties involved and in the worst case scenario, be considered assault or rape. 
(If you think having this conversation will kill the mood, consider what being accused of assault or rape will do to your future interactions.)  
 If you do not follow this code, you run the risk of being accused of assault, rape or may acquire a bad reputation. If you are addressed in regards to your sexual behavior by a partner or an organizer, it’s a very important time to listen deeply and take it as an opportunity to become a more skilled human being. If you become defensive or indignant, you may be permanently and publicly banned from all events run by the organizers at Tuesday Night Blues. Colorado takes these accusations seriously and most other organizers will take the same action and will communicate with other national organizers.

 

Short Hand:

DO NOT USE OUR DANCE SCENE AS A PLACE TO FIND ‘HOOKUPS.’
TAKE YOUR TIME GETTING TO KNOW SOMEBODY BEFORE SEXUALLY ENGAGING THEM.
USE YOUR WORDS TO ASK SOMEONE OUT.
EXPLAIN YOUR CURRENT DESIRES BEFORE ENGAGING ROMANTICALLY OR SEXUALLY.
MAKE IT VERY SAFE FOR SOMEONE TO SAY NO TO YOU.
DO NOT SETTLE FOR LESS THAN ENTHUSIASTIC CONSENT.
DO REPORT PREDATORY BEHAVIOR.
DO REPORT RAPE AND ASSAULT TO ORGANIZERS.
DO REPORT RAPE AND ASSAULT TO THE POLICE.
IF YOU REPORT RAPE OR ASSAULT GIVE YOUR FULL REPORT TO THE ORGANIZER AND POLICE.
IF YOU ARE CONFRONTED ABOUT COMPROMISING THE CODE LISTEN.
BE PREPARED TO TAKE RESPONSIBILITY AND ADJUST YOUR BEHAVIOR.
DO NOT BECOME INDIGNANT. 

 

Consequences if a dancer compromises this section of the Code of Conduct:

You will get a “reputation.”
An organizer will directly communicate with you what has been said and done.
You will be requested to adjust your behavior.
You will be suspended until the issue is resolved with the other party.
If there are multiple offenses or if you physically assault someone you will be permanently and publicly banned from all of our social events.
Your behavior will be reported to a larger network of dancers.

 

 

Floorcraft:

 

DO NOT DO LIFTS OR AERIALS! These are moves that require a large amount of momentum and taking both feet off of the ground. These moves are used in performance Lindy Hop and occasionally in the style Ballroomin’ during a performance or competition. They are never appropriate on any social dance floor at any event. 

Sometimes we bump into each other. If this happens, take a moment to turn around and smile and apologize to the person you bumped into. It’s a really bad feeling when someone bumps into you and then won’t acknowledge you. They might even wonder if you did it on purpose! Eek!

Attend classes because there is much more to learn about floorcraft besides what’s mentioned here. you will gain the tools you need to be successful in sharing the floor with many other moving bodies.

We supply mints throughout the restaurant, use them. Some people sweat a lot and for those folks, we recommend packing a couple of extra shirts.  

 

Short Hand

DON’T DO AERIALS!
APOLOGIZE IF YOU BUMP INTO SOMEONE.
GO TO CLASS.
STAY FRESH N’ CLEAN.

Consequences if a dancer compromises this section of the Code of Conduct:

You can expect that other dancers will become annoyed with you and will refuse to dance with you.
The organizer or host for the evening will directly request for you to adjust your behavior. 
If you refuse to comply or become indignant you will be asked to leave. 
If this is a repeat offense you may be suspended for an appropriate amount of time from attending the dance or other social events hosted by Tuesday Night Blues organizers.

 

Live Music

 

We host live bands once or twice a month and we are so lucky! Do your best to attend these nights and learn more about Blue Music as you learn about the dance. Some bands play for us regularly, but all bands have a first night playing for dancers. Our community has been working to bridge the gap between dancers and musicians. You can be apart of that by showing our musicians your gratitude by clapping after each song and sometimes hootin’ and hollerin’ during a sweet solo. If you enjoy the band, they almost always have CD’s available and we highly recommend supporting your local artists by purchasing one for yourself! 

 

Short Hand
GO TO LIVE BAND NIGHTS TO LEARN MORE
CLAP AFTER EVERY SONG
DON’T BE AFRAID TO HOOT AND HOLLER
BUY A CD!
WE RECOMMEND EARPLUGS


Consequences if a dancer compromises this section of the Code of Conduct:

Well...none really, except you’ll be super sad that you missed such an awesome night of Blues!

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